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  Topic Review (Newest First)
10-07-13 05:48 PM
SAKozicki
Quote:
Originally Posted by SAKozicki View Post
What an excellent guide! I wish I had it fifteen years ago, it would have saved me mistakes on one Accord two Legends and my current 2002 RL. You've covered it all, especially the part about breaking in new pads and rotors. Sometimes the 6 mm screws can be hard to remove, so I use either WD 40 or a spray or bolt loosening liquid generally available at Pep boys or NAPA, combined with a tool that you wack on the end with a sledge hammer, and it turns the screw counter-clockwise. (I forgot what it's called, but the vibration and the torqe loosens the screw every time without stripping). I would also ad, for a really premium front brake job, try EBC sloted and dimpled rotors, plus a set of their pads or Akino(sp?) pads. I have these on now and think they're great.
To update, the pads are Akebono, and I think they make Acura's OEM because they are identical. I use them on my five different Acuras and they stop on a dime. I stopped using EBC rotors and just use Bembos, at about $60 a pair, and don't bother resurfacing the old ones. The scrappers pick up the old ones before the municipal garbage truck gets them, so I figure that's capitalist recycling.
06-25-11 10:13 AM
boljangles Nice write up thank you
09-17-10 10:37 AM
ZRXXX it will probably just smoke a lot and smell bad. You're not gona have a flaming caliper if that's what you were thinking. Have a fire extinguisher near by if you're concerned.Torches are fun and you don't need to get it that hot to break it lose.
09-17-10 07:41 AM
usafa93 Thanks for the advice. That is exactly what I was wondering (about the piston and the rotor). I'll put on the old pads for the trip for tools.

Using a torch will be new for me. When I first apply the heat, is there an issue with all the lubricant I've been spraying on these bolts? I'm guessing a lot of that will be gone from the trip to the Home Depot and back.

Thank you for all your coaching; I really do appreciate it.
09-17-10 01:20 AM
ZRXXX that's not a suggestion that I'd make. The first time you pressed the break the caliper would push the piston out against the rotor. I don't know if it would go far enough for the piston to completely push out of the caliper or if it would just hit the rotor. You can also try picking up a small torch and heat up the bolts. You'll have better luck through heat then lubricant IMO. I saw this on sears online but you can probably find a cheaper one at home depot.
_http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_005W125660110001P?prdNo=6&blockNo=6&blockType=G6
09-17-10 12:09 AM
usafa93 I'm not afraid of beating the $h!t out of a part I'm replacing, but that just doesn't seem to be working - yet. It's been my experience that if you hit something long enough, it will eventually come free. I've been using a 4 pound short-slege so far, with no luck.

It's about midnight here, so I'm going to spray another shot PB on it (hope - not a great strategy). I may end-up reinstalling the old pads and making a run to Sears for a long wrench. Or maybe to Home Depot for a 1.5 foot cheater-bar pipe.

What would happen if I ran the car with everything in place, but no brake pads installed on one rear brake?
09-16-10 11:25 PM
ZRXXX Now that I think about it, I do have a cracked 14mm socket in my trunk and I couldn't remember how I did it. Those rear bolts were a bitch. If I remember correctly, I used a 3/8 drive ratchet and I put the round end of a 3/4 inch wrench around the handle and used it for leverage, along with whacking it with a 1lb hand sledge. Don't be afraid to break anything. Pretend it's not your car and hit that mofo!
09-16-10 07:47 PM
usafa93 BTW, is there an election coming up? As I'm working on my brakes there are 4 Sea Kings flying overhead and landing in the +$20MM-house neighborhood nearby (so close - yet so far away!) I know of only one guy that travels like that.
09-16-10 07:43 PM
usafa93 Thanks for the response ZRXXX. I have the passenger-side wheel off, and I'm all set with the locator screws. I did need to use an impact driver on one of them. The caliper is also free, and I have it hanging from a wire.

But I have a new headache - the two caliper mount bolts. When I did the front brakes, I used a 1/2 inch driver with a 14mm socket attached to a torque wrench (not for specificity, but for leverage). Where these babies are located (behind the rotor), the torque wrench head is too big, so I've been trying with smaller wrenches and sockets. I've soaked the thing several times with PB, which (who knows?) is supposed the be the gold standard for rusted-on bolts. Still no luck.

Do you have a suggestion on a particular tool (wrench, socket, whatever) to break those bolts free? I know it's 14mm, because I've shredded two 3/8" connector 14mm socket heads trying to bust them out. If the 1/2 impact driver socket would fit, I know that would do the job, but I can't seem to squeeze it in there.
09-16-10 05:04 PM
ZRXXX Not really? Since you're not replacing the parking break pads, there should not be any adjustment needed. Although it may be a bit of a tight pull getting the rotor off. Make sure you have an impact screwdriver to remove the 2 Philips screws that hold the rotor in place
09-16-10 02:06 PM
usafa93 What a great write-up; thank you. I wish I would have seen this a couple of months ago when I did my front brakes.

Question: I'm getting ready to do the rear brakes; I'll probably start today. Changing the pads, rotors, and painting the calipers (gun metal grey - it looks tremendous on the front brakes). Is there anything I need to know about the parking brake, other than make sure it is not engaged? Thanks.
07-09-09 07:00 PM
SAKozicki
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZRXXX View Post
And don't forget the importance of flushing your break fluid. Otherwise it will absorb all sorts of moisture and ruin the seals on your calipers. I've replaced 3/4 calipers, and they all started going around the same time; 150K miles
I hear ya! I'm at 166,000 on my 2002 RL and I replaced the front two calipers due to the pistons rusting. One of the back ones needs it, too, but I was doing the job on a Saturday, and had to just clean the rust off with a wire brush on a grinder, and put it back into the caliper. It works, but a temporary fix for a rear brake. A new set of calipers is in store for the rear wheels soon.
02-15-09 02:54 PM
ZRXXX And don't forget the importance of flushing your break fluid. Otherwise it will absorb all sorts of moisture and ruin the seals on your calipers. I've replaced 3/4 calipers, and they all started going around the same time; 150K miles
02-15-09 12:45 PM
SAKozicki
Quote:
Originally Posted by Budreau68 View Post
FYI, when I replaced all four rotors on a 98 RL, on each wheel one of the two 6mm screws was next to impossible to remove. 20-30 minutes each of penetrating oil and tap with a hammer.

I don't like the idea of using phillips head screws for this application, though I know why they did it. Be careful not the mess up the heads of the screws over torquing. If you do, try one of those screw/bolt out solutions sears and others sell. I have since purchased an impact screwdriver, basically you hit it with a hammer and it turns your impact force into a rotaional force hopefully breaking free the screw/bolt. I got one for $6 from harbor freight, haven't used it yet.
Yeah, that "thing" I described earlier is called an "Impact driver." Mine is from Great Neck tools. Cheap, but good. It's indispensable for removing those stubborn screws. Also, I've found Akebono pads to be great. They have better grabbing power than OE, but they are ceramic, so they are more durable and have less dust. Aimco rotors are a great replacement for rear brakes. My EBC slotted, dimpled on the front have over 50k on them now, no issues. I've found the caliper bolt cleaning and lube is an absolute must on every job, or else you're going to wind up with a warped rotor from brake pads frozen onto the rotor. Make sure the piston boot is properly seated on the caliper piston, or else the piston will rust and freeze as well. My 2 cents, hope it helps.
08-06-08 03:58 PM
Budreau68 FYI, when I replaced all four rotors on a 98 RL, on each wheel one of the two 6mm screws was next to impossible to remove. 20-30 minutes each of penetrating oil and tap with a hammer.

I don't like the idea of using phillips head screws for this application, though I know why they did it. Be careful not the mess up the heads of the screws over torquing. If you do, try one of those screw/bolt out solutions sears and others sell. I have since purchased an impact screwdriver, basically you hit it with a hammer and it turns your impact force into a rotaional force hopefully breaking free the screw/bolt. I got one for $6 from harbor freight, haven't used it yet.
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