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Discussion Starter #1
With the last race of this year’s Super GT already over and done with, fans of Honda have been left wondering what will replace the current NSX GT car for next season.
nsx-gt-6

Due to new Super GT regulations forcing the use of FR cars for the 2010 season, fans of the mid-engine Honda saw the last race of their venerate NSX earlier this month at Twin Ring Motegi Circuit here in Japan. With it’s first debut back in 1997 at the then All Japan GTC (followed by the JGTC and now Super GT), the NSX has had an illustrious career, claiming 49 poles with 36 race wins from 105 starts. With all this, Honda and the NSX teams have obviously attracted a multitude of fans and supporters over the last 13 years. But now, with rule changes forcing the end of the NSX’s career, Honda has announced that it will continue it’s participation in the Super GT. With an FR S2000 you say? Well no, actually with none other than it’s shelved FR Super Sports V10.

The shelved project, which had to be put on permanent hold along with Honda’s F1 involvement due to the economic crisis, will find new life and will be used as the base for the GT car in season 2010.
587_super_gt_nsx_2

But surely it’s not possible!? While at first the idea may seem a little far fetched it all makes good sense. Before being given the axe, the FR V10 was under going development and work on a Super GT variant was already in place. It’s release was to coincide with the release of the road going version into the market. Times have changed though and whilst the race version of the car will be released next year, its road friendly counterpart will not. Honda will use special permission from the organizers of Super GT to allow this to happen and let the car compete in the GT 500. This will also let Honda off the homologation hook, meaning no limited run of V10s will have to be made or sold unlike the unicorn like NSX-R GT. (More photos below)


While details at this point in time are still sketchy, Honda will be releasing more details shortly and we await what FR goodness will be in store for us come 2010.

 

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Oh wow, the V10 is back from the dead! I would have loved to see the V10 NSX in production, but I suppose this is better than nothing. What a great reason to watch SuperGT :D.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Update

We knew it was coming and now we've got details. According to the latest reports out of Japan, the Honda NSX will live on, but mere mortals will never get a shot behind the wheel.

As previously reported, Honda has been actively petitioning the Japanese Automobile Federation (JAF) -- the organizing entity behind Japan's Super GT series -- to run a new front-engine racer in the touring car championship. A cursory reading of the rule book states that vehicles campaigning in SuperGT must be production vehicles (think GT-R, MR2, SC430). However, Honda's found a loop-hole.

Just as Toyota has done in recent years with the Supra (it's out of production), the Super GT rules specify that a vehicle's specs and design must be submitted to JAF to be approved. That means that a vehicle can be "production ready," if not actually in production. So for the 2010 SuperGT season, Honda will bring out an all-new race car based on the NSX prototype (seen above), reportedly packing a 3.4-liter V8.

So... Lawyers: 1. NSX's lovers: 0. But at least we get to see it race...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
NSX Rendering

This is the first image of Honda’s NSX racer that has been released.
While it is true that Honda’s flagship sports car is being seriously considered for production, it’s possible that it is preparing a race version codenamed HSV-010. This vehicle is slated to participate in next year’s Japan Super GT Series.

Also, it is possible that it will have the same front engine, rear drive layout as the road version, but it will most likely not use 4WD. According to a Honda insider, when the announced that it was canceling the NSX project in late 2008, an R&D team was actually testing the car at Suzuka Circuit.

 

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Discussion Starter #6
Engine Info

Plans are moving forward for Honda to reveal its new V8 racing car in Japan, the HSV 010.

While the programme hasn’t been fully buttoned down yet, as we hear it, this new car – loosely based on Honda’s axed 'next NSX' project – is tipped to appear in January but will definitely be for track only.

Honda put a lot of time and work into developing a new front-engined V10 super-coupe, to go head to head with the Lexus LFA.

The car was seen testing and was close to being signed off when Honda pulled the plug in winter 2008 as the economic crisis hit, around the same time Honda announced it was quitting Formula One.

Sources say Honda’s plan was to launch the new V10 super-coupe as the Acura Sports, its launch timed to coincide with the debut of Acura, Honda’s luxury dealer channel, in Japan.

In the end, both projects got canned, but not before Honda put quite a bit of work into developing a separate, pure race version of the Acura Sports for Super GT, Japan’s hugely popular tintop race series.

The Super GT version of the Acura Sports would carry the road car’s silhouette but underneath it would be totally different, with an all-new carbonfibre chassis and swapping the road car’s 5.0-litre V10 – good for 500bhp plus – for a race-bred 3.4-litre V8 to meet the new Super GT regs.

Those regs would also see the road car’s high-performance, rear-biased Super Handling 4WD system exchanged for a simpler, more robust rear drive layout, again to meet Super GT regs.

Honda will build a limited run of race cars to meet the requirements of the Super GT teams and the 3.4-litre V8 will come across from Japan’s Formula Nippon single-seater series.

It’s a 90-degree V8 with 3400cc capacity, rev-limited to 10,300rpm and good for 600bhp plus. For Super GT duty, the engine will have to be significantly reworked for a more endurance spec. Super GT races are longer and harder than Formula Nippon and each engine also has to last for four races.

The V8 engine will also be air-restricted to 500bhp to meet the regs in Super GT’s top GT500 class, but will lose the rev limiter.

Honda, it’s believed, is keen to present the HSV 010 as an all-new car, and an unveiling seems likely in Japan before the end of January.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Pic

The Honda NSX might be gone, but it's set to live on as the HSV-10 GT in Japan's SuperGT championship.

Although we don't have an official release or specs yet, we do have the image above and some preliminary details on the HSV-10 GT or Velocity Sports Honda. Built to the 2010 GT500 regulations, the new front/mid-engine racer from Honda is packing a 500+ hp, 3.4-liter V8 and sending power through the same Ricardo sequential manual gearbox fitted to the 2010 SuperGT cars from Nissan and Toyota. Underneath all that glorious carbon fiber is the same chassis Honda's been working on (originally as an NSX replacement) for the last two years. The SuperGT season opener is scheduled for March 20 and 21 of 2010, but we expect more details and a host of high-res images to hit soon. Stay tuned...
 

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Discussion Starter #10
HSV10 GT Specs

Honda today dropped official details and additional high-res photos of its new HSV-10 GT race car, which will compete in the GT500 class of the 2010 Super GT Series.

Power comes from a 3.4L V8 making 500-hp with a maximum torque of 289 lb-ft. It is mated to a Ricardo sequential gearbox with steering wheel paddle shifters.

Makes us wish even more that the Honda / Acura NSX was a real production car.

Honda HSV-10 GT:

PHP:
Press Release:
	Honda HSV-010 GT: Specifications and performance characteristics
Dimensions, weight 	Length × Width × Height (m) 	4.675 × 2.000 × (not disclosed)
Wheelbase (m) 	2.700
Vehicle weight (kg) 	1,100 or more
Engine 	Engine name 	HR10EG
Configuration 	Liquid-cooled, naturally aspirated, longitudinal V8
V angle (°) 	90
Valve train 	Gear-driven DOHC: 2 intake and 2 exhaust valves per cylinder
Displacement (cm3) 	3,397
Bore × stroke (mm) 	93.0 × 62.5
Compression ratio 	(Not disclosed)
Maximum output (kW[PS]) 	370 (500) or more
Maximum torque(N·m[kg·m]) 	392 (40.0) or more
Throttle control system 	Mechanical
Fuel supply system 	Programmed fuel injection system (Honda PGM-FI)
Fuel 	Lead-free premium gasoline
Lubrication 	Dry sump
Powertrain, running system 	Transmission mechanism 	Constant mesh
Transmission shifting method 	Steering paddle shifter
Steering system mechanism 	Rack and pinion system with electric power steering (EPS)
Tires(Front·Rear) 	330/40R18 ·330/45R17
Brake type and mechanism 	Hydraulic ventilated disc system
Suspension system 	Double wishbone
Stabilizer 	Torsion bar
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Rumor

Straight out of the Snowball's Chance and Swine Aeronautics department comes a report from Autobild that says the Honda HSV-010 is headed for production next year.

Why are we so skeptical? Aside from the fact that taking the HSV from the tracks of Japan to the streets of tomorrow would be a task of epic proportions, the last time we talked about the GT500 racer with Honda's high performance team they began tearing up about the NSX successor's stillborn status.

Regardless, ze German rag reports that the HSV-010 will undergo a slight makeover in the transition from race car to road car, with a slightly narrower track, more sculpted sides and the removal of the Cessna-sized rear wing.

A V8 will supposedly still be nestled up front, but instead of the SuperGT car's 3.4-liter V8, a 500+ horsepower 5.0-liter will take its place.

So, is the Lexus LFA finally going to get a worthy competitor from it's cross-town rivals? We'll continue our regularly scheduled breathing regime until we get an official word from Honda, but the possibility of an NSX revival – for real this time – has us panting a little bit harder.

 
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