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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey, I'm new to this forum and also relatively new to the wonderful Acura vigor. This is my first car. It's a gem, with a 5 speed and only 105k miles on the clock. However, my abs pump will not kick on. When I got the car, the abs pump reservoir was bone dry. I have since topped it off, as well as replacing a bad 50A fuse for the pump motor. However, even when jumping the 2 relay terminals, the pump still won't come on. I think it may be seized or have burnt brushes. Is it possible to rebuild the motor? I've had no luck finding a replacement. Any help is greatly appreciated.
 

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Anti-Lock Braking Systems are relatively complex and diagnosing issues arising in this area can be somewhat difficult. Are you confident the pump is the issue? Are you confident it’s the ONLY issue? How did you determine this?

If you’re not sure the best way to diagnose the problem(s) is to use either a generic or vehicle specific OBD II tester to read the control module memory. I believe some of the ABS systems in this generation also had flash indicators which can assist in identifying an issue based on the number of times the ABS lamp illuminates/blinks if an issue is detected. If you’re able to determine a code, refer to Acura’s ABS trouble code guide to identify specific issue(s). I have a list of the ABS codes as well if needed.

If the pump assembly (or a part of it) is truly defective, before you spend money replacing it you may want to consider two things:

1. Are you sure it’s the only defective system component? There’s a good chance the wheel sensors are defective as well, especially if you live in a cold weather climate where excessive salt and road chemicals are used in the winter (trust me – I speak from experience on this one). You might be looking at another $500 - $1,000 in that case. Before replacing anything you’ll want to know all costs involved to get your ABS working again.

2. Do you really need a functioning ABS system, and is it an issue worth fixing? Your car sounds like it’s in good shape with low mileage so it might be a good investment if you’ll be driving for years to come.

If you need to replace the pump motor, it is NOT recommended you install a used part. In order to install the pump you’ll need to disconnect the negative battery cable, remove the old pump motor from the modulator unit, relieve the ABS system pressure by removing the relief plug, install the new pump motor into the modulator unit, and reconnect the battery cable.

I located a pump assembly for sale through Delray Acura (www.acuraoemparts.com). The part number is 57310-SL5-A53.
Unfortunately, this will set you back almost $900 after shipping. They may not even have it in stock since it's been discontinued, so you might want to check first if you go that route.

Any other Acura dealer or auto shop should be able help you locate a pump assembly as well.

Good luck and GREAT first car choice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
My first step was jumping the blue 2 pin connector under the dash. I was flashed ABS code 1-2; faulty pump motor circuit. I have checked all fuses associated with the abs, and tested the pump motor relay. The only thing that was bad was the 50 amp fuse labeled "abs pump motor". After replacing this, I pulled the fuse labeled "abs b2" to reset the dash light. After a few seconds, I reinstalled it and turned the ignition to on. The pump motor never kicked on, and after about ten seconds there was an audible click in the dash, followed by my abs light coming on and staying on, as it was when I bought the car. My concern is not necessarily with the functionality of my abs system, it's the fact that my car won't pass state inspection with the light on. (I live in Rhode island, inspection here is good for 2 years. Mine runs out at the end of October.) the only code I got was for the pump motor circuit. Really, all I need is to get my dash light off and get rid of the trouble code. I know it seems kind of unsafe, but I would not be opposed to "deleting" the system if it would stop the abs computers from producing a DTC.
 

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You won't pass inspection simply because the ABS light is on? That sounds bizarre to me. When an anti-lock braking system is defective, it simply becomes a non-ABS braking system (generally). A lot of people won’t even bother to fix it at that point and just drive their vehicle with a standard non-ABS braking system. By that logic, they should ban all cars without an anti-lock braking system, right?

Sorry to hear it if that’s the case. I’d just pull out or disconnect the ABS lamp unless they actually check for DTCs in the inspection. If so, I guess you'll just have to clear it. Either way, driving without a functioning ABS shouldn't be a major safety concern. You just won't have ABS.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Also, is there any way I could clear the code and have it stay cleared? The inspector does a bulb check, so unfortunately I can't just pluck the bulb out. Inspection in RI is an automatic failure if a vehicle equipped with antilock brakes has the abs light on.
 

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plum , it's as simple as removing a light bulb ;)

as of if you wanna try and repair your abs pump , it's not that hard really , only thing you gotta watch out is the high pressure container and no stripping the nuts.
So after you disconnect your nuts (i use thick vice grip to loosen) there is a bleeder screw, put a hose and a container to it and bleed, caution , it's under very high pressure!

then simply disassemble the pump and clean the rust , most important is the piece you see in the photo, make sure you put it together same way you took it apart
 

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