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I figure there's got to be a bunch of garage warriors here who can steer me right on a new floor jack.

I've been tempting fate using the OEM scissor jack for years now for small maintenance jobs. I know it's not safe, but every time I've gone to buy a floor jack, I get super confused about how to pick one that's not too expensive but also not cheap out and get something that will end up being just as unsafe as the scissor jack.

This Autoguide ranking of floor jacks has already been updated for 2023, so I assume these models are all still pretty readily available. https://www.autoguide.com/best-floor-jacks

Their top recommendation is sold under a bunch of different brands and the cheapest version I can find is a little under $400. Is that what I should be spending, or is 3-tons overkill (the heaviest thing I work on is my sister's Honda Odyssey)?

I'm not looking to cheap out, but it's awfully tempting to buy the $100 options I see in flyers. Can anyone explain what to look for and what to avoid?
 

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  1. Find your gross vehicle weight and front and rear weights on the sticker inside your door or in your vehicle's manual.
  2. Be sure to get more weight lifting capacity than you need.
  3. Don't go overboard – the higher the capacity, the slower and heavier the jack.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
  1. Find your gross vehicle weight and front and rear weights on the sticker inside your door or in your vehicle's manual.
  2. Be sure to get more weight lifting capacity than you need.
  3. Don't go overboard – the higher the capacity, the slower and heavier the jack.
Do I need a jack that can lift the full weight of the vehicle, or just some portion of it (since two or three wheels will still be on the ground)?
 

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I just purchased the Powerbuilt 620516 2-ton U-jack from Amazon, $220 USD. It has a U-shaped lifting pad so you place floor jack stands in-between once you lift the vehicle. I had a nail with a very fast leak my 19 MDX and I just made it home before going completely flat. It was such a pain the the butt getting the scissor jack out and use to switch out to the spare.

I would make sure to get pair of 2-ton jack stands and wheel chocks also. You have to read the fine print on jack stands that come in pairs and make sure the weight limit is for each and not weight limit combined.


 

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I figure there's got to be a bunch of garage warriors here who can steer me right on a new floor jack.

I've been tempting fate using the OEM scissor jack for years now for small maintenance jobs. I know it's not safe, but every time I've gone to buy a floor jack, I get super confused about how to pick one that's not too expensive but also not cheap out and get something that will end up being just as unsafe as the scissor jack.

This Autoguide ranking of floor jacks has already been updated for 2023, so I assume these models are all still pretty readily available. https://www.autoguide.com/best-floor-jacks

Their top recommendation is sold under a bunch of different brands and the cheapest version I can find is a little under $400. Is that what I should be spending, or is 3-tons overkill (the heaviest thing I work on is my sister's Honda Odyssey)?

I'm not looking to cheap out, but it's awfully tempting to buy the $100 options I see in flyers. Can anyone explain what to look for and what to avoid?
Watch the YouTube Channel "Project Farm". This guy recently did an excellent review of a number of floor Jacks. I was surprised how good The Harbor Freight Daytona model did in the evaluation

Astrobuf
 

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I have never been a big fan of Harbor Freight, especially not too many years ago, but some of their products are pretty good. One of the good ones is their Daytona hydraulic floor jack. I've been using one for about the last year or so. Built very well, goes low enough to get under our ILX and will lift my truck with ease. I also use it on my big block '66 Impala. I use it a lot and am very pleased with it.
 

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When picking a floor jack, there are a few key things to consider:

  1. Capacity: Make sure the jack has a capacity that is at least as high as the weight of the heaviest vehicle you will be lifting.
  2. Lifting Range: Consider the maximum height you need to lift the vehicle to, and pick a jack with a suitable range.
  3. Stability: Look for a jack with a wide base and a low center of gravity for added stability when lifting.
  4. Durability: Look for a jack that is made from high-quality materials and has a reputation for durability.
  5. Portability: If you need to move the jack around frequently, consider a lightweight, portable option.
  6. Safety feature: Many newer jacks have safety features like overload protection and locking mechanisms to keep the vehicle securely in place while being lifted.
Some good floor jack brands include, Arcan, Sunex, Torin, Blackhawk and Craftsman.
 
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