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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2006 Acura TL (base), currently with a set of new Bridgestone Turanza Serenity Plus tires. I was really happy with them until this winter. We recently moved to a house on a hill near Boston where they plow minimally. I've already had to enlist the help of some very nice neighbors twice to push the car. Based on reviews, I'm thinking of getting a set of Continental Extreme Winter Contact tires. Worth it? Or will I not notice much of a difference?
 

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Ok, after some research, decided yes, snow tires are worth it. One shop interestingly recommended I get a second set of wheels, undersized. So, instead of my usual 235/45R17, have 215/55R16 as it's supposed to be better for snow.
 

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Ok, after some research, decided yes, snow tires are worth it. One shop interestingly recommended I get a second set of wheels, undersized. So, instead of my usual 235/45R17, have 215/55R16 as it's supposed to be better for snow.
I would agree with his idea. Getting a smaller wheels will surely be better for snow purpose plus tires will be cheaper.
 

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From Popular Mechanics ww.popularmechanics.com/cars/how-to/repair/can-all-season-tires-really-handle-the-snow?click=main_sr]]

Can All-Season Tires Really Handle the Snow? - Winter Tires vs. All-Season Tires - Popular Mechanics

In a contest between all-season and winter tires driven on snow and ice, the latter won the day. Although the year-round rubber performed admirably, it's clear in all situations that with either FWD or AWD there's a substantial advantage to having proper rubber under you. The results were especially striking during braking and cornering, when snow tires improved performance by up to 5 percent and 20 percent, respectively.

Buying and living with winter tires isn't that much of an inconvenience, but there are some guidelines you should follow:

If you live anywhere north of the Mason-Dixon line, it's probably worthwhile to invest in winter tires.

Make sure you buy four tires; skimping and putting winter tires only on the drive end of the car will result in unpredictable handling and could be dangerous.

If you'd rather not remount your tires each season, pick up a separate set of inexpensive steel wheels for permanent winter-tire duty. (This also keeps expensive alloy wheels from getting damaged in harsh, salty winter conditions.)

Swap to winter tires around Thanksgiving and back to all-season or summer tires around Easter—winter tires' softer rubber compounds wear quickly in warmer temperatures.

Store off-season tires in a cool, dry area out of the sun, and consider wrapping them in black plastic bags to reduce oxidation.

Keep in mind that having two sets of tires isn't doubling the expense, it's halving the wear. You'll have twice the number of tires but buy new ones half as often.

Remember, fancy new tires or not, the standard winter driving advice still applies: Slow down, double your following distances, anticipate traffic changes ahead, and give yourself extra time to get where you're going. Good luck out there!
 
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