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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I need to order a replacement part for the AC wiring harness. The problem is I'm having trouble finding it. I'm not sure how it would be listed, since I can't find it on Amazon.com, Autozone, and the like.

I understand that a damaged AC wiring harness is a common problem with this model generation, and I'm already planning on replacing the blower motor. So, I might as well replace the AC wiring harness. Does the blower motor resistor come with the AC wiring harness, too?

Thank you very much for any help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've never seen problems with the A/C wiring harness in the 2nd generation TL, only in early TSXs.
Thank you very much for your response. You seem reputable; have you seen any issues with the 2nd generation TL, related to the HVAC motor blower? I have thought there were was a service bulletin for the sub-harness connection burning or melting (see: honda-tech.com/showthread.php?t=3107736).

That's why I'm looking for the part number to replace the A/C wiring.

Thank you.
 

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That thread pertains to a 2006, which is a 3rd gen TL. I haven't personally seen that type of issue with that car, either.....at least nothing that I can recall offhand.

I haven't seen the harnesses melt, but I have seen the motors overheat. The whole reason that the motors were prone to overheating is when the air vent tube on the motor itself becomes clogged.

Take a look on the motor, and there will be a short curved vent tube. This allows air to circulate around the motor armature. When this becomes clogged, the motor overheats, and can, in very rare cases, melt the connector at the motor itself. As long as this vent tube is clean, you won't have any issues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well I checked the fuses and they are fine. I couldn't unplug the connector from the blower motor, not even after applying dielectric grease. It's really, really in there. The wires don't look melted or smell but I do see some wire exposure. My theory is the unit overheated and the pastic connector melted to the unit's plastic housing. That's y the connector is stuck. Maybe I can cut the plastic housing on the blower motor, since I'm replacing it. Or, I can cut the plug and get a new one. Does anyone know where I can get a replacement ac wire harness connector for the blower motor??
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Were it my car, I'd try prying it up with a screwdriver, making sure that the power to the motor is shut off, of course.
Thank you very much for your help. I might try heating it up with a heat gun and/or pry it open with a screwdriver.

When you say the power is off, do you mean make sure the ignition is not on or you mean the vehicle's battery is removed from the circuit?

I know that this is the first time it's been removed and it usually is harder the first time to remove a part, but this is unbelievable. It was cold and raining when I was attempting to remove it and that certainly didn't help but still.

When I put it in, I'm going to apply a prodigious amount of grease. And I wonder if they make a rubber housing for the connector, like they do for computer molex connectors, to protect the connector and make it easier to grip, even for tools. I know they make molex removal tools but that's for individual pins, not for plugs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well, I have officially given up on getting this plug out. I tried heating it up and cutting/bending the plastic with a screwdriver to help ease the plug out but it won't budge at all. It's as if the plug is soldered onto the connection or glued with epoxy. I noticed that someone colored in a small green circle on the inside of the blower motor, which probably means this isn't the first time the blower motor has been replaced. My guess is whoever installed it didn't do the greatest job.

Having said all that, I might just take it to a mechanic, but I'm wondering what would a full shop, with a full arsenal of tools and qualified, experienced mechanics do that I can't or have not done? How would a mechanic get this plug out?
 

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Here's a head-on shot of the connector from a blower motor I pulled from stock. This type of connector has a center locking tab that is pushed down to remove the plug from the blower motor. Assuming, of course, that you did that :) , if it were mine, I'd just grab a pair of pliers and yank.

Now, if you're just trying to verify power at the motor, you don't necessarily need to remove the connector. You could use a pair of wire stripping pliers, and simply pull back about 1/4" of the insulation on the wires (not cutting them), and then after testing, put a piece of black tape over the sections that you stripped. If you're going to do that, just strip the wires at different spots (not right across from each other), to prevent any short circuit in the future.
 

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