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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I think my '16 Acura RDX recommends 34 psi in the tires. I've seen posts here that say some prefer 37 psi for better mileage and that's what I've been using.

I'm doing a 2 month "snow bird" in the Phoenix area where the temperature has been in the mid 80's and touching 90 a few days ago. When I pull out of the garage, the sensor says 37 psi, but within 5 miles or so, the tires go up to 40 psi.

I'm wondering if this is more likely to cause a blowout and whether I should deflate to say 34 psi in my remaining days here. I'll be heading north in a week.

Comments???
 

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The tire pressure for the front and rear tires is listed on the driver door jam. This is the pressure the tires should have when the tires are cold. As you note the tire pressure increases as the tires get warm.
 

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The recommended pressure for my 2016 RDX is 35 front and 33 back.

The pressure goes up 2 lb after 10km driving which I find harsh/bouncy. I will not pump it beyond the recommended pressure as it would be too uncomfortable to drive.
 

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As others have stated, your tire pressure will always go up on any vehicle once you start driving, even in the winter as normal rolling resistance creates friction and therefore heat.

What is key, is the COLD tire pressure. You can actually go all the way up to the tire manufacturer's MAX PSI without any issues of tire safety (even with them warming up when driving), needless to say the higher you go the stiffer the ride will be, which isn't always a bad thing.

I had a 2008 Prius that I bought new and kept the tire pressure year round at the tire posted MAX PSI cold, I think it was 51 PSI if I recall now. I drove it like that for 4 years, had perfect tire wear (measured regularly with a tire depth gauge) and it greatly improved my fuel economy, thus the point of the Prius.

Normally, on my other vehicles, I run about 1-2 PSI higher to get better fuel economy and better handling on the road. The pressure indicated on the door jam is a 'recommendation' from the car manufacturer for the greater overall masses to provide a nice ride and handling baseline.

There is no harm in bumping it up a couple PSI and seeing what it does for your mileage, just stay within the MAX PSI rated on the tire.

I'm looking at getting my first Acura, an RDX and as I do allot of highway driving will be adjusting the PSI up a couple PSI for better fuel economy and tire wear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
There is no harm in bumping it up a couple PSI and seeing what it does for your mileage, just stay within the MAX PSI rated on the tire.

I'm looking at getting my first Acura, an RDX and as I do allot of highway driving will be adjusting the PSI up a couple PSI for better fuel economy and tire wear.
All good information. My '16 RDX came with non standard 20" wheels. The door frame placard lists pressures for 18" wheels (35# front, 33# rear). I've been running 37# for no particular reason although I probably get slightly better mileage. The ride is smooth with 37# front and rear.

IF you're buying a '16 and money is not a big factor, I would strongly recommend getting the "Advanced" package which includes "Lane keeping". It also includes adaptive cruise control although that might be available on other packages as well.

I'm just back from a trip (Seattle to Scottsdale) of 1,500 miles each way. Both of the above options greatly made the drive less tiring and probably safer to boot.
 

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I think my '16 Acura RDX recommends 34 psi in the tires. I've seen posts here that say some prefer 37 psi for better mileage and that's what I've been using.

I'm doing a 2 month "snow bird" in the Phoenix area where the temperature has been in the mid 80's and touching 90 a few days ago. When I pull out of the garage, the sensor says 37 psi, but within 5 miles or so, the tires go up to 40 psi.

I'm wondering if this is more likely to cause a blowout and whether I should deflate to say 34 psi in my remaining days here. I'll be heading north in a week.

Comments???
You should definitely not over pressure the tires or risking them to blow out in higher speeds. Remember that the tire pressure increases after a few minutes of run due to air heating inside the tires. Thus 34 psi is the correct pressure since it will raise up to 39 psi while driving.
 

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On the side of the actual tire, there is a MAX PSI rating. THIS is the MAX PSI you do not want to go over when the tire is COLD (this is not 32F cold either, it's ambient temp).
Increasing your tire pressure over the door sticker is fine so long as you stay within the MAX PSI on the side of the tire.

As stated, ALL tires, even when driven in the coldest of winter will go up in temp once friction takes place and they start rolling, but this is factored in.

The sticker on the door is the 'recommended' factory tire pressure to provide the best ride, in both comfort and fuel economy.

You also need to remember to check your tire pressure at least once every couple of months or at a minimum twice a year in areas that are prone to winter and summer driving.

Tire pressures will go UP & DN by ~1 PSI for every 10 degrees in ambient temp outside.

Always check when COLD. :wavey:

You should definitely not over pressure the tires or risking them to blow out in higher speeds. Remember that the tire pressure increases after a few minutes of run due to air heating inside the tires. Thus 34 psi is the correct pressure since it will raise up to 39 psi while driving.
 
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