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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I was looking at this '97 TL and from a standing start, it engages fine but proceeds to accelerate slowly. And this symptom was sudden. Earlier in the day was fine then the middle of the day it started with this issue. Oil looks fine. Is there anything I'm missing? Do these cars have solenoids, do I need to change the tranny oil screen? Idk....someone help please.
 

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Slipping automatic transmissions are typically a very bad sign (usually a bad pump inside the transmission requiring replacing the transmission, usually with a freshly rebuilt unit, not many people can deal with rebuilding an automatic transmission in a transmission shop. Replacing a transmission will cost thousands... less than $4000, more than $2000.

You can have a transmission service (flush and fill with fresh transmission fluid, clean screen, replace filter if there is one, replace gasket) and MAYBE (not likely, possibly a 10% chance or less) that will dislodge something blocking a passage in the transmission and it will start working right. But before you have that done (really needs to be done with proper equipment in a shop that knows what they are doing, equipment to do this well is not cheap) check the transmission fluid level (owner's manual will tell you how to do this, you do NOT simply pull out the transmission dip stick and look at the fluid level. Usually the car has to be running and in gear when you check the fluid level, but I don't remember if that's the case for the TL auto trans or not. Read the owner's manual, follow he instructions. If the fluid level is low enough, there could be slippage. But if the car isn't dripping when it is parked, it's not very likely to be low on transmission fluid... UNLESS there is a bad seal. Bad seals can be unpredictable. A bad seal between the engine and transmission can allow motor oil to leak into the transmission and OVERFILL the transmission. It will usually kill an automatic transmission if motor oil has been inside the auto transmission for any length of time. A bad seal on an output shaft of the transmission will cause transmission fluid to drip when the car is parked (and when it is moving for that matter). Slippage could also indicate problems in the clutch pack or torque converter. Because all of those things are possible causes, it makes ZERO sense to diagnose the problem to a single bad part and just fix that (like a pump) because the transmission will have to come out for that. It's far smarter to replace every wear part or out-of-spec gear... rebuild the transmission or replace the trans with a rebuilt unit.
 
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